Photo-impressionism with GFX50s

Last year was rather eventful with a medium format Fujifilm replacing my old X-T2 and X-Pro2 cameras. Primarily to take my landscape and aerial photography a step further, but also continue street and black and white photography. That seemed like a strange move since the X-system is ideal for travelling light, but once you see the image files that the medium format produces with insane detail quality and its ability to render light and colour, it is very difficult to go back to the smaller sensor system. Yet, both GFX50 bodies S and R are well sized and relatively light, on par with the full frame system, and keep traditional X-system physical dials to operate them. In addition, the EVF quality is fantastic, all lenses are metal and have aperture rings, so it was a very easy transition from XT2/XPro2 to GFX50S/R.
The first project that had an “upgrade” was "Waterworld". The second take of the project was shot during last summer and is a series of photographs taken through the waterfall window of a London office building, where I was kindly permitted to shoot. I loved the photo-impressionistic effect created by shooting through running water that removes the precise focus and subject matter leaving it up to the viewer to envisage and complete the picture. All the shots were made with GFX 50s combined with 32-64mm f4 lens handheld, with shutter speed at average 1/320s and lens at 32-36mm and f11 to get more focal depth. Post-editing was done in Lightroom 6. Did I notice the difference between X and GFX system produced images in similar conditions? Oh, yes :) the images are super sharp, full of light and details and colour rendition is fantastic. I am looking forward to seeing first prints soon too, as this was one of the main reasons for the upgrade. I hope you enjoy the images - click or tap on any image to adjust it to your screen size.

Photo-impressionism with X-Pro2

Four years ago I bought Fujifilm X-Pro1 and my photographic journey began. Much has changed in my photography since but I still learn both technically and creatively. During the last two years I was doing plenty of street shooting trying to find my way of seeing this very dynamic and ever changing scenery. As I have a natural leaning to b/w images I wanted to explore colour more and whilst doing so I wondered (just like many others) how much of a subject and colour is needed to communicate a vision and/or a scene. So the "waterworld" project was started. The project was shot during this summer and is a series of photographs taken through the waterfall window of a London office building, where I was kindly permitted to shoot. I loved the photo-impressionistic effect created by shooting through running water that removes the precise focus and subject matter leaving it up to the viewer to envisage and complete the picture. Most of the shots were made with X-Pro2 combined with 16-55mm f2.8 or on a few occasions with 14mm f2.8 lenses. The project is still ongoing so this is pretty much the first part of it, with a selection of shots taken during day time and which I think reflect what I had in my mind when I started it. Post-editing was done in Iridient Developer and Lightroom 6. Click or tap on any image to adjust it to your screen size.

CitizenM hotel staircase with X-T1

A stonesthrow away from the Tate Modern there is a small hidden gem of London's spiral staircases. CitizenM hotel has a modern wooden staircase, which will blow your mind. Fortunately the helpful staff have placed a couple of swivel chairs at its foot so you can either zen meditate or comfortably take a few shots of this masterpiece. As usual for architectural shots I used three lenses - Fujinon 14mm f2.8, Samyang 8mm f2.8 and Fujinon 10-24mm f4, all with the Fujifilm X-T1. The latter has a tilting LCD screen which is perfect for shooting this kind of photography. The space of the staircase is rather tight so the best shots to my liking were made with 8mm and 14mm f2.8 lenses. The 10-24mm f4 zoom was used close to its its widest ~12mm but this lens does not impress me in a low light conditions. The X-T1 combo with 8mm or 14mm lens is light, even with the vertical grip attached, which I have most of the time, and great to shoot handheld. Post-editing was done with Iridient Developer, Photomatix and Lightroom 6. Click on any image to adjust it to your screen size.

 

Wellcome Collection staircase with X-T1

The Wellcome Collection is full of wonders, but the new spiral staircase by Stirling Prize winning architects Wilkinson Eyre completed in spring 2015 is a masterpiece. The steel staircase spans three floors and is a visual feast. Unlike other stairs it feels like a living form with its irregular shapes and changes in width and direction. I used three lenses - Fujinon 14mm f2.8, Samyang 8mm f2.8 and Fujinon 10-24mm f4, all with the Fujifilm X-T1. The latter has a tilting LCD screen which is perfect for shooting this kind of photography. The best shots to my liking were made with 8mm f2.8 and 14mm f2.8 lenses. The 10-24mm f4 zoom was used pretty much at its widest - 10mm. This is an emerging pattern after a few months of shooting with all three and I feel that 10-24 zoom will get swapped for a 10mm or 12mm prime in the nearest future. The X-T1 combo with 8mm or 14mm lens is small and light, and great to shoot handheld, try to hold DSLR with similar focal length lens in outstreched hand and shoot 1/30. Post-editing was done with Iridient Developer, Photomatix and Lightroom 6. Click on any image to adjust it to your screen size.

 

The Brewer staircase with X-T1

The Brewer staircase is the beautiful spiral staircase at Heals department store, Tottenham Court Road, London (map attached). Designed by Ambrose Heal’s cousin Cecil Brewer, the stairs were completed in 1916. Despite a large amount of people passing through the store not many are aware of its existence. All you need to do is to enter the store, walk about 20 steps and turn left, walk straight for another 30-40 steps and the entry to the staircase is in front of you. The store staff are very friendly and as long as you are not obstructing other people's activities you are welcome to take pictures. Some images were taken during the Christmas holidays, thus extra decorations along the stairs. Shooting this beauty is challenging and gives anyone a good run for their wide-angle glass collection. Getting the right exposure is tricky and sometimes shooting upwards into the light I used an ND4 filter. I used three lenses- Fujinon 14mm f2.8, Samyang 8mm f2.8 and Fujinon 10-24mm f4, all with the Fujifilm X-T1. The latter has a tilting LCD screen which is perfect for shooting this kind of photography. Post-editing in Iridient Developer, Photomatix and Lightroom. Click on any image to adjust it to your screen size.

10mm f5 1/60 ISO 1600

10mm f7.1 1/15 ISO 1600

10mm f5 1/60 ISO 1600

8mm f5.6 1/125 ISO 1600

11.5mm f4.5 1/30 ISO 1250

10mm f7.1 1/15 ISO 1600

8mm f8 1/3 ISO 200

10mm f7.1 1/15 ISO 1600

8mm f8 1/60 ISO 800

10mm f5 1/30 ISO 640

8mm f5.6 1/30 ISO 3200

8mm f5.6 1/125 ISO 1600

8mm f5.6 1/60 ISO 1600

8mm f8 1/60 ISO 1600

8mm f5.6 1/60 ISO 1600

8mm f8 1/60 ISO 2500

8mm f5.6 1/125 ISO 3200

8mm f5.6 1/10 ISO 3200

14mm f5.6 1/25 ISO 1600

8mm f11 1/9 ISO 3200

8mm f8 1/60 ISO 1600